Thursday, December 2, 2021

Construction Contractors Board sweep of Oregon Coast nets 27 violations

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Justin Werner
Justin Werner is a publisher/journalist living in Lincoln City, Oregon. He strives to get all sides of a story and maintains strict ethical standards for both of the publications he oversees.
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Twenty-seven construction violations at 207 active job sites, including three in Lincoln City, were uncovered last week in two enforcement operations from the California and Washington borders to the middle of the Oregon Coast.

The sweep, conducted April 8-11 by the Construction Contractors Board included 11 instances of working without a license, four lead-based paint violations and other miscellaneous violations.

“There were three violations in Lincoln City,” CCB Enforcement Program Manager Stan Jessup said. “Violations occurred in Yachats, Newport, Waldport, Nehalem, Manzanita, Cannon Beach, Seaside — a bunch all over the place.”

By law, nearly everyone who builds a home or alters a structure must be licensed by the CCB, and contractors who bid and perform work on homes built before 1978 must have a lead-based paint license.

“Unlicensed contractors don’t offer any protections for the consumer,” Jessup said. “This is really about consumer protection.”

The CCB offers many consumer protections to homeowners who hire licensed contractors. CCB’s dispute resolution section provides mediation services to homeowners in dispute with their licensed contractor. The CCB also requires all licensed contractors to carry a bond and insurance, to protect homeowners.

Homeowners who hire unlicensed contractors have little recourse when a home improvement goes wrong. Some homeowners choose to go to court at their own expense, but many simply give up and hire a licensed contractor to repair the damage.

Consumers can protect themselves by hiring contractors with an active CCB number that must be displayed on all advertising, vehicles, business cards and social media.

The CCB encourages homeowners to verify their contractor’s license on the CCB website.

CHECK A CONTRACTOR LICENSE

Anyone with questions can call the Construction Contractors Board at 503-378-4621.

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